Myotonic dystrophy
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Myotonic dystrophy present management, future therapy

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Published by Oxford University Press in Oxford .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Myotonia atrophica.,
  • Myotonia atrophica -- Treatment.,
  • Myotonia atrophica -- Patients -- Care.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Statementedited by Peter Harper ... [et al.]
ContributionsHarper, Peter S.
The Physical Object
Paginationxii, 251 p. :
Number of Pages251
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL22579798M
ISBN 100198527829

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Aug 14,  · Myotonic dystrophy is part of the group of muscular dystrophies. It is the commonest inherited muscular dystrophy and has a profound effect on individuals who are diagnosed with the disease and their families. It is present for many decades of a patient's life but, unlike the other dystrophies, it also affects the organs in the body, making /5(8). Sep 21,  · Myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) is characterized by myotonia (90% of affected individuals) and muscle dysfunction (weakness, pain, and stiffness) (82%), and less commonly by cardiac conduction defects, iridescent posterior subcapsular cataracts, insulin-insensitive type 2 diabetes mellitus, and testicular imeldaclyde.com by: The Facts: Myotonic Dystrophy, by Prof. Peter Harper, published by Oxford University Press, A hundred-page book written for families living with myotonic dystrophy, written in easy-to-understand language. A good place to begin educating yourself. Available online at Oxford University Press or imeldaclyde.com Also included in the Myotonic. Aug 21,  · Myotonic dystrophy is a disease that affects the muscles and other body systems. It is the most common form of muscular dystrophy that begins in adulthood, usually in a person’s 20s or 30s. This disease is characterized by progressive muscle loss and weakness. Myotonic dystrophy may be further classified into two types, and the two types may affect different muscles.

Myotonic Resources The Facts: Myotonic Dystrophy. Authored by Prof. Peter Harper, published by Oxford University Press, This one hundred-page book written in easy-to-understand language for families living with myotonic dystrophy is a good place to begin educating yourself. Myotonic dystrophy is a genetic condition which is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern and thus will be passed along to 50% of a carrier's offspring, on average. Myotonic dystrophy is one of several known trinucleotide repeat imeldaclyde.comn areas of DNA have repeated sequences of three or four nucleotides. [citation needed]Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is an inherited imeldaclyde.com: Genetic disorder (autosomal-dominant). Oct 15,  · Myotonic dystrophy is part of a group of inherited disorders called muscular dystrophies. It is the most common form of muscular dystrophy that begins in adulthood. Myotonic dystrophy is characterized by progressive muscle wasting and imeldaclyde.com with this disorder often have prolonged muscle contractions (myotonia) and are not able to relax certain muscles after use. Apr 20,  · Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (MD1), one of the two types of myotonic dystrophy, is an inherited type of muscular dystrophy that affects the muscles and other body systems (e.g., heart, eyes, endocrine system, and central nervous system). MD1 has three forms that somewhat overlap: the mild form, classic form, and congenital form (present at birth). The mild form has the least severe .

The Facts Book Each book in this popular series offers practical advice about an illness or condition in a clear and accessible style, written by leading authorities in the field. When the first edition of Myotonic Dystrophy: “The Facts” was published in , it was widely appreciated by families, support groups, professionals, and. Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is a form of muscular dystrophy that affects muscles and many other organs in the body. The word “myotonic” is the adjectival form of the word “myotonia,” defined as an inability to relax muscles at will. Filing for Social Security Disability with Muscular Dystrophy. The SSA does recognize muscular dystrophy as a qualifying condition under their published Blue Book of Medical Listings. It is important to understand, however, that a diagnosis of the condition is not enough to qualify an individual for benefits from the SSA on its own. This book is useful only for patients and the lay public and has little to offer medical professionals. There are comprehensive books on the topic for neurologists by the same author (Myotonic Dystrophy: Present Management, Future Therapy, Harper et al. (Oxford University Press, ), Myotonic Dystrophy, 3rd edition, Harper (Saunders, )).